7 Speaking Trends — How to Make a Powerful Presentation Today

The fundamentals of a great speech stay the same. (Develop one strong idea. Focus on the audience. Be authentic, clear, and committed.) But styles change with time. These are the latest trends in speeches and presentations.

1. Keep it Short

People want information, but they’re already overwhelmed by too much information. If you give them what they need to know in a way they can quickly understand and apply, they’ll love you. Get to the heart of the matter in as few words as possible. Say what you have to say. And stop speaking — even if you haven’t spoken for the allotted time.

2. Let’s Get Personal.

In this age of Oprah, interactive websites, and blogs, formal presentations are out. Instead, savvy speakers are speaking conversationally. They’re less likely to “make a speech,” more likely to talk to their audiences. They move away from podiums. They use personal stories and anecdotes. They say I and you, we and us. They encourage audience interaction.

3. Simple Is Chic.

Sophisticated technology is simple — at least for the end user. A point-and-shoot camera takes in all sorts of data and makes innumerable, complex calculations so you don’t have to. Successful speakers do the same thing. They do their research. They decide what’s important. And they present what the audience needs to know in a way the audience gets.

4. The Love Affair with PowerPoint(TM) Is Over.

Audiences are no longer wowed by PowerPoint(TM). They take it for granted, and if anything they’re a little bored by it. Use it as a tool, a way of presenting information. But don’t let it upstage you. Keep yourself up front and personal.

5. Recycling Is Good for What Ails You.

Creating a good speech takes a lot of time. So once you’ve created a presentation, reuse it. Don’t think you have to come up with something new for each occasion. You can give the exact same speech word for word to a different audience, and it becomes a different speech. Take bits and pieces from one presentation and repackage them. Trim a 45-minute in-depth presentation into a 15-minute overview of your topic. Or use your 15-minute overview as an outline for a longer presentation.

6. Mark your Territory.

It’s almost impossible to come up with something brand new and original to talk about. After all, how many news ways are there to make a sales, a speech, or a successful relationship? Winning speakers take the best of what’s already known and make it new by making it their own. They put their own spin on it, using a unique (and consistent) choice of words and phrasing. Think Chicken Soup for the Soul, the One-Minute Manager, and Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus. New stuff or clever packaging?

7. Everyone Wants a Security Blanket.

It’s a scary world, and people are afraid of losing what they have. They want something or someone who will make them feel safe. If you’re going to challenge them to change, you need to show them why. And you need to reassure them that what they get will be better than what they leave behind. Threats — implied or explicit — will make people react in the moment, but they won’t sustain people’s long-term efforts.

4 Tips Regarding Superior Dollar Store Presentation

When it comes to owning a dollar store there are certain things that can not be denied. For example, a top location is better than a 2nd or 3rd tier location. Being well funded is certainly more likely to support success than being underfunded. If you want to stack the deck in your favor, one area requiring focused effort is store presentation. That includes everything from the layout of your store to the management of dollar store merchandise. In this article I present 4 tips regarding superior presentation.

Tip #1) Your store layout is crucial to your business success. Don’t attempt to shortcut the time you invest to create the right store layout for the space you have available. Be sure to maximize the amount of gondola display area without sacrificing the wide-open appearance that is crucial. Leave enough space in aisles for shopping carts to easily pass. Be sure you don’t jeopardize store safety by creating blind corners or tight spaces. Leave enough room so all of your dollar store merchandise can be displayed. Be sure to maintain clutter-free product displays and that it is easy for customers to reach the products they seek.

Tip #2) Cleanliness can never be sacrificed. Consider store cleanliness during the initial set up of your business. Make it easy for employees to see shoppers throughout the store. Make it easy for employees to see when sweeping or clean up needs to be done. Make it a practice for employees to be alert to items left on the floor; always make it a priority that nothing is allowed to sit on the floor. Make it a priority to make certain floors are always clean.

Tip #3) Dollar store merchandise quality is especially important for those who shop at a dollar store. No matter how attractive the display, selling inferior products will drive customers away. Don’t expect to achieve success by saving a few pennies on items that fall apart as soon as shoppers leave the store.

Tip #4) Effective merchandising requires ongoing focused time and effort when you own a dollar store. Make sure shelves, displays and racks are kept full of dollar store merchandise. Make it a practice to routinely rotate your store inventory. Always include clearly visible signage on end caps and displays to draw attention to specials. Finally, meet the needs of your customers by carrying merchandise that is in demand.

In Body Language & Negotiations: If You See Fists, See Opportunities – Negotiation Tip of the Week

In body language and negotiations, if you see someone displaying a fist, that’s the time to see opportunities. That’s true in any aspect of your life and even more so in a negotiation.

In a negotiation, when a negotiator displays a fist they’re displaying several hidden thoughts. They’re exhibiting signs of angst and/or possibly fear, along with a narrower mindset. It’s also a sign that the other negotiator wants to alter the current environment in ways that might not be overly pleasant for you.

In such situations don’t cower. Instead, display a sense of calmness, self-assuredness, and commitment. You might even consider matching the tonality of the other person or lowering your tone; one action versus the other would depend on the person displaying the gesture, your relationship with that person, and where you would like to take the negotiation next.

The point is, when you see a negotiator display a fist, understand the thought process that’s going through his mind. If you display weakness at such times, you could be inviting more of the fist displaying behavior.

When such a display is brandished, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Is this a ploy to see how I’ll react?
  2. Is this an attempt to intimidate me?
  3. If this is an attempt to intimidate me, how might I respond to display his lack of effectiveness?
  4. What precipitated his behavior and is it founded?
  5. Should I apologize for a perceived infraction and if I do what effect will that have on the negotiation?
  6. What is he attempting to do with his fist gesture versus another gesture that might reveal his unhappiness?
  7. Have I missed a gesture(s) that I should have been more aware of and if I did, what might it/they be?
  8. Should I openly acknowledge his demeanor and what will that do to the negotiation?
  9. How might I assuage his behavior while displaying empathy and not letting him take advantage of me?
  10. What opportunities are now before me as the result of his current mindset?

When someone displays their fist, it’s usually a sign of aggression. Thus, you have to heighten your awareness to the factors mentioned above to assess why the display was made at this time and the effect that such a display has on the mental state of mind of that negotiator and the negotiation.

If you’re astutely attuned to such a gesture, you’ll realize that a mental shift has occurred. That shift can also give you an opportunity to control the negotiation. That’s true because at the point of the fist display, what you do after you see it will determine what occurs in the negotiation from that point.

So, in the future, when you see someone displaying a fist, don’t become afraid. Instead, consider what manner of control you’ll exercise to move the negotiation in the direction that serves your purpose. If done so masterfully, the other negotiator will apologize for his behavior. That will give you a greater sense of control because you’ll be in a position to be amicable by allowing him to amend his behavior via a concession or whatever serves you. For the time it last, he’ll be malleable. Use it to your advantage… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!