The Structure Of a Good Presentation

Great orators have always been a force to moving or influencing people. The world has seen its share of charismatic speakers that have made heads of nations, spiritual personalities, movie or music celebrities, company heads and even dictators. People are moved by the skill of a great orator or the effectiveness of his or her presentation skills. But what is it about their presentation that resonates with so many people? Or should we ask an even more important question – what is a Presentation skill?

While certain specific presentation techniques are universally common, Business Presentation Skills have a certain tried and tested method that anyone aspiring to be a good presenter in the corporate world, can learn from. In this article we will look at a few such aspects that make up the structure of a good presentation:

  1. An Agenda With a Purpose: The speaker needs to know where he or she wants to go with the presentation – what is the message that he or she wants to convey? Who is the target audience? These are questions that a presenter needs to know the answers to, well before they take the stage to give a presentation. Proceeding through a plan is much more effective if one has a map and a plan. That should be the primary objective of having an agenda.
  2. Meticulous Preparation: Regardless of the confidence of the speaker’s message, they must always prepare ahead of time to do justice to the goal of the presentation. Trying to stumble through the presentation without a plan doesn’t work and neither is it professional. The presenter must be prepared to clarify vague issues and also tackle troubleshooting questions. It also helps to arrive ahead of time in order to get a good feel for the environment.
  3. The ‘Sandwich’ Structure: Just like a sandwich, every presentation must have three distinct parts to it that requires slightly different approaches. Most speakers tend to focus only on the ‘body’ of the presentation but fail to make a good first impression or fail to end their message well once done with the body. Beginning with a good attention-grabbing introduction that makes a good impression is vital to starting off on the right note. A good opener sets the tone for a good presentation.

The body of the message is where most of the intended content is placed. The speaker must take his time in unpacking the major elements of the body in a clear and concise manner. Holding eye contact and keeping an ‘open’ body posture helps to relax the crowd and feel connected with the speaker. Often speakers rush through their presentation without proper pausing or spacing due to nervousness or haste and end up looking anxious and insecure. Well-timed pausing can be useful to the presenter and must be used tactfully to allow the depth of the content to sink in to the listeners’ minds and hearts.

Finally, ending a presentation well gives a good finishing touch to the presentation and ends with a note of closure for the listeners. If done well, the listeners will leave with a good appreciation for the value of the message. It helps to finish on a positive note while also thanking the listeners for their time and patience.

Presentation Skills Training is an important aspect of corporate training that helps companies equip their employees with good communication and presentation skills and make them effective speakers or presenters.

The Quaich – From 17th Century to the Present Time

The word Quaich comes from the Gaelic word “cuach” which means cup. Throughout Scotland’s history it has been used to symbolise love and friendship.

It is thought that the first quaichs developed from scallop shells which were used ascups for drinking whiskey by people in the Highlands.. Similar to scallop shells quaichs were wide and shallow in design. handles were added to make them easier to hold. The shape of the quaich has been fixed for more than four hundred years.

Initially quaichs were made from a single piece of wood, from the late 17th century as craftsmen became more proficient they used light and dark wood and strands of copper to create intricate patterns from this time the skills needed to make quaichs were highly regarded. Other materials such as a range of materials were employed to make quaichs from stone and brass to horn and silver. The centre of the quaich was sometimes decorated with a silver coin or disc featuring a coat of arms or family motto – as well as adding a decorative aspect it serverd to hide any joins. The lugs (handles) were frequently covered with silver or pewter where the owners initials could be displayed. During the 17th century in Scotland there was a craze for adding ones initials to property.

In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie took the quaich with him to England when he travelled down from Edinburgh with his army. These quaichs had a glass bottom so that the drinker could keep an eye out on his drinking comrades.

The most romantic Quaich had a double bottom in which a lock of hair was placed, in 1589 King James VI of Scotland gave Anne of Norway such a Quaich as a wedding gift.

A piper is often rewarded for his participation at ceremonies with a draft from a quaich.

The quaich is still popular today and can be employed at many occasions:

It is used at many Scottish weddings, offered to guests at the top table as a symbol of the shared love of the bride and groom; at christenings it is used to drink to the health of the new child and in celebration of new life; as a welcome or farewell cup by clan chiefs.

Commemorative quaichs, inscribed with a team motto can awarded as a prizes, or given as gifts, these are commonly made of pewter or silver.

Quaichs are popular for toasting an occasion from wedding anniversaries to new year.

Whether for ornament or use they make gorgeous presents, an can be engraved with a personal message.

PowerPoint Tip – Turn Off Pop-Ups When Presenting

In a given day, or week, or month, how many messages pop up on your computer to:

* Update Java, RealPlayer, or Windows?

* Connect to a wireless network?

* Remind you of an upcoming meeting or birthday?

* Keep you up to date on your subscribed RSS feeds?

Warning: Some of these pop-ups may appear while you’re presenting in slide show view! Not a pretty picture!

After a few minutes of inactivity (let’s say you’re answering questions), does your screen saver kick in, or does your computer go into hibernation mode?

Before you get into such a situation, right now, start making a list of the pop-ups that you see, and research how to turn them off. It’s not always easy to find the answer, because the software companies want you to see those pop-ups!

One possible solution may be to disconnect from the Internet, or disable your wireless connection, if you don’t need it during the presentation. Remember that many meeting venues have wireless networks, so your computer may try to connect during your presentation. And disconnecting may disable many other pop-ups. The method depends on your operating system.

In Windows XP, you would probably choose Start> Control Panel> Network Connections. In Windows Vista, try Start> Control Panel> Network and Sharing Center.

You can configure Windows updates by choosing Start> Control Panel> System and clicking the Automatic Updates tab. In Windows Vista, choose Start> Control Panel> Security or Security Center> Windows Update. If you turn them off during your presentation, remember to turn them back on afterwards!

However, some pop-ups don’t depend on an Internet connection or may still pop up a message asking you to connect! For example, Outlook reminders may use your computer’s internal clock. Therefore, you should try disconnecting from the Internet and see whether or not you still get some pop-ups. Of course, you can’t do that for several times just to make sure – that would probably be going too far! But the more planning and testing you do, the less likely that embarrassing pop-up will show its ugly face during your presentation!