Multi-Person Presentations – Maintaining Balance in Power and Knowledge

Whether there are two or ten people involved in developing a presentation it is wise to start with the end in mind. Collaboration starts with a meeting of minds. Everyone should agree in principle about the purpose of the presentation and the expected outcome. At the first meeting assign a coördinator and have everyone ready to state why the chosen topic is relevant, and of current interest to the target audience. The organizer must stress that all discussions will be open and honest. The questions for each person to answer revolve around the problems they name and the solutions they will offer.

It is important to agree about who their message will target before crafting a marketing strategy. The methods of marketing used will depend on the type of event, whether educational or a sales presentation. An effective way to begin an advertising campaign is for each participant to contact their centers of influence. All of the presenters have responsibility for a successful event. One cost-effective way to market is via email invitations to existing contacts.

There are many ways to view a topic and so different presentation styles of multiple presenters provides variety and flavor. Avoid confusion among presenters by thorough planning at the onset. How will responsibilities be apportioned? Be specific as possible about required tasks, performed by whom and the timing. During the preliminary planning meetings make decisions about the content, order of presentation, length of time per segment, and which part each person will present based on their area of ability.

Decide what monetary contribution each participant will make to prepare for the presentation.. Will there be fliers, handouts, posters or tickets printed? Who will design the needed material and see that they are ready on time for distribution? Assign persons in charge of acquiring the site, setting up the room and equipment, and then cleaning up afterwards. Who will greet the attendees and seat them? All must agree how to reimburse for upfront expenditures.

Who will follow-up with attendees and by what means? Decide during the planning meetings how revenues generated as a result of the presentation will be split. When there are multiple presenters all may not benefit equally from taking part in the event. That’s when the good negotiators have the edge. The agenda once set should leave all presenters feeling respected and satisfied that they will have enough time to share their knowledge. The result will be a balanced, well executed event.

In Body Language & Negotiations: If You See Fists, See Opportunities – Negotiation Tip of the Week

In body language and negotiations, if you see someone displaying a fist, that’s the time to see opportunities. That’s true in any aspect of your life and even more so in a negotiation.

In a negotiation, when a negotiator displays a fist they’re displaying several hidden thoughts. They’re exhibiting signs of angst and/or possibly fear, along with a narrower mindset. It’s also a sign that the other negotiator wants to alter the current environment in ways that might not be overly pleasant for you.

In such situations don’t cower. Instead, display a sense of calmness, self-assuredness, and commitment. You might even consider matching the tonality of the other person or lowering your tone; one action versus the other would depend on the person displaying the gesture, your relationship with that person, and where you would like to take the negotiation next.

The point is, when you see a negotiator display a fist, understand the thought process that’s going through his mind. If you display weakness at such times, you could be inviting more of the fist displaying behavior.

When such a display is brandished, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Is this a ploy to see how I’ll react?
  2. Is this an attempt to intimidate me?
  3. If this is an attempt to intimidate me, how might I respond to display his lack of effectiveness?
  4. What precipitated his behavior and is it founded?
  5. Should I apologize for a perceived infraction and if I do what effect will that have on the negotiation?
  6. What is he attempting to do with his fist gesture versus another gesture that might reveal his unhappiness?
  7. Have I missed a gesture(s) that I should have been more aware of and if I did, what might it/they be?
  8. Should I openly acknowledge his demeanor and what will that do to the negotiation?
  9. How might I assuage his behavior while displaying empathy and not letting him take advantage of me?
  10. What opportunities are now before me as the result of his current mindset?

When someone displays their fist, it’s usually a sign of aggression. Thus, you have to heighten your awareness to the factors mentioned above to assess why the display was made at this time and the effect that such a display has on the mental state of mind of that negotiator and the negotiation.

If you’re astutely attuned to such a gesture, you’ll realize that a mental shift has occurred. That shift can also give you an opportunity to control the negotiation. That’s true because at the point of the fist display, what you do after you see it will determine what occurs in the negotiation from that point.

So, in the future, when you see someone displaying a fist, don’t become afraid. Instead, consider what manner of control you’ll exercise to move the negotiation in the direction that serves your purpose. If done so masterfully, the other negotiator will apologize for his behavior. That will give you a greater sense of control because you’ll be in a position to be amicable by allowing him to amend his behavior via a concession or whatever serves you. For the time it last, he’ll be malleable. Use it to your advantage… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

How To Combat The Negative Effect Association Has On Negotiations

Have you ever considered how the associations you make about the other negotiator affects your mental state of mind during a negotiation? You more than likely realize that your brain is influenced by subliminal stimuli, based on the associations you make. The associations can be in the form of how you feel about the other negotiator, and/or the surroundings in which the negotiation occurs. Have you considered how to combat such associations when they don’t serve you?

This article delves into perception and security, as two aspects of how you can raise your awareness, per the associations you make during your negotiations.

Perception:

We give our power to those to whom we wish to ingratiate ourselves. We also do so to those that we perceive as having the ability to deliver us from one position to another. Thus, we view such deliverance as beneficial to our well-being.

Negotiation Tip: During your negotiation, you should question the amount of credibility and credence you give the other negotiator, based on how well your joint negotiation outcomes are aligned. Stated differently, to the degree that both of you are pursuing outcomes that are accepted as being mutually beneficial, you can lend more credence to actions that display that demeanor. To the degree your outcomes are adverse to one another, be cautious per the amount of power and control you give away.

When it comes to perception, you must understand preferably at a logical and emotional level, why you wish to subjugate your power to any individual, even more so during a negotiation. In giving your power, you reduce the focus that you might otherwise apply to offers and counter-offers. Suffice it to say, if you wish to relinquish your power do so as part of your negotiation plan. Then, make sure by doing so, you gain an improved position in the negotiation.

False Sense of Security:

There will be times when you’re in environments that will cause you to drop your guard. You may do so because the situation ‘feels right’ based on the accoutrements and trappings in the environment. Be aware when you experience such emotions and don’t fall prey to such surroundings. By maintaining your mental equilibrium, you’ll be more watchful for circumstances that are not beneficial to your negotiation position and expected outcome.

During your negotiations, you’ll be bombarded by ideas, offers, and counter-offers. Be sure to address each in a mindset that’s not clouded by undeserved attributes that don’t serve you. In essence, keep your wits about you and don’t be lulled into a false sense of security, due to the surroundings and goodwill that’s displayed. Be judicious, forthright, and very aware about your needs and why you’re negotiation. I’m not suggesting you be selfish, I’m suggesting you look out for yourself and don’t be overwhelmed by undeserving accoutrements to which you lend undue credibility. If you keep in mind the suggestions above, you’ll enhance your negotiation process. You’ll come out further ahead in your negotiations… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!