Effective Teaching & Lecturing Presentation

No matter how often you carried the position as a presenter, teacher or lecturer; being new doesn’t mean to be less capable. You’ll be able to perform an effective presentation as long as you know the basic ingredients in making your presentation, teaching or lecturing works well for you and your audience.

Master your subject or topic
The most important key is that you must master the knowledge that you are about to transfer, whatever the subject might be. The more prepared you are in understanding all the necessary aspect to support your subject, the more effective the knowledge would be transferred to your audience. The more you knew, the more they will learn (from you).

Know your personal style
Everyone have their own style based on their personal power and limitation. You should have a unique presentation style. But if you decide to expand your skills, you must prepare yourself with a powerful presentation tool. Remember that you should be careful when it comes to include a joke, because in the certain audience’s mood or perception — sometime it could become a boomerang for you.

Know your audience.
To make an effective presentation you must know your audience before you start your presentation. Relevant topics would make a better perception for your audience. If you haven’t got the chance to do it before the presentation occurred, you must get to know them by asking them what you want to know in the beginning of your presentation. This way you are set for a collaborative, two-way interactive meeting.

First impression does matter.
You always start with an impressive intro to catch their attention. Take half a minute to introduce yourself to all your audiences; you can also use it as an opportunity getting use to the new stage environment. You should also pay a serious attention to what you are wearing and how you are carrying yourself in front of audiences.

Make a catchy intro.
Make a brief & interesting intro on the subject of the presentation. Take a few minutes to talk about the background, history, related supporting topics, etc. It also a good thing if you spare the time to explain the bigger picture of your presentation. So it would be guidance through the topics you will cover — both for you and your audience to stay focus on the given roadmap.

Don’t under estimate an ice breaker.
With an icebreaker, you can bring more enjoyable & informative experience for your audience. As a presenter you can sneak in some witty words or inspirational motivation to your audience to keep their spirit high tuning into your word — until the last session of your presentation. An ice breaker would be more effective if you know your timing.

Make a necessary pause & punctuation.
When delivering your presentation, make sure to take necessary pauses & punctuations, so it won’t sound like you are rambling. It is essentially important if you are a fast talker by nature, or when you are easily carried away in enthusiasm explaining about other supporting topic. Even if you do this to cover up your nervousness, you should give your audience an opportunity to digest all the information while digesting it through for a minute or two.

You’re not suppose to do all the talking!
Just because you are the presenter, teacher or lecturer — it doesn’t mean that you are the only one to do all the talking. By making a two-way interactive conversation you could prevent your audience getting bored by your speech. It is a good way to make an organic interactive presentation, because it means your audience is getting little closer in understanding what you explained earlier to them. You can use it as a brief moment to help you relax and refocus to the next topic in your roadmap.

Invite questions from your audience.
A good presenter would always find a way to invite audience to ask some questions & let everyone participate. You can also pass the wild ball around the audience to measure how much they keep up with what you were saying. It also makes them to pay a better attention & keep them away from sleepiness.

There is a never ending process to be a great presenter, teacher or lecturer — because all great one is come from ongoing practices to shape their perfection.