PowerPoint Tip – Turn Off Pop-Ups When Presenting

In a given day, or week, or month, how many messages pop up on your computer to:

* Update Java, RealPlayer, or Windows?

* Connect to a wireless network?

* Remind you of an upcoming meeting or birthday?

* Keep you up to date on your subscribed RSS feeds?

Warning: Some of these pop-ups may appear while you’re presenting in slide show view! Not a pretty picture!

After a few minutes of inactivity (let’s say you’re answering questions), does your screen saver kick in, or does your computer go into hibernation mode?

Before you get into such a situation, right now, start making a list of the pop-ups that you see, and research how to turn them off. It’s not always easy to find the answer, because the software companies want you to see those pop-ups!

One possible solution may be to disconnect from the Internet, or disable your wireless connection, if you don’t need it during the presentation. Remember that many meeting venues have wireless networks, so your computer may try to connect during your presentation. And disconnecting may disable many other pop-ups. The method depends on your operating system.

In Windows XP, you would probably choose Start> Control Panel> Network Connections. In Windows Vista, try Start> Control Panel> Network and Sharing Center.

You can configure Windows updates by choosing Start> Control Panel> System and clicking the Automatic Updates tab. In Windows Vista, choose Start> Control Panel> Security or Security Center> Windows Update. If you turn them off during your presentation, remember to turn them back on afterwards!

However, some pop-ups don’t depend on an Internet connection or may still pop up a message asking you to connect! For example, Outlook reminders may use your computer’s internal clock. Therefore, you should try disconnecting from the Internet and see whether or not you still get some pop-ups. Of course, you can’t do that for several times just to make sure – that would probably be going too far! But the more planning and testing you do, the less likely that embarrassing pop-up will show its ugly face during your presentation!

Real Estate Negotiation – 7 Best Strategies

An important part of our job as Realtors is to help our clients negotiate for the best deal on a house. Your confidence and professionalism in this area will make your service memorable to your clients. Here are some strategies to help you guide your clients through the negotiation process.

1. Constantly re-establish trust.

Establishing trust between the parties is the most important strategy in any negotiation. Buyers and sellers know that the other party has interests that are in conflict with theirs. They begin with a certain amount of wariness of each other. It is valuable to establish rapport quickly. Show them that you and your clients will be reasonable to work with. Here are some ways for your clients to establish common ground:

Communicate that they have a common hobby, the same type of job, moved here from the same area, went to the same college, have similar children’s needs, or other relatedness.

Present evidence that your clients are qualified to buy the property.

If your buyer works for a well-known company, this may increase the seller’s trust.

Never delay your counteroffers. Show respect for the seller’s time.

Communicate that the buyer appreciates the home.

Begin the negotiation by establishing rapport. Then continue to reinforce it throughout the closing process. I have noticed that buyers are often reluctant to show that they like the house. They believe that an aura of disinterest will help their negotiation. I recall a transaction in which the buyers met the seller, and expressed how much they liked the house. During the negotiation the seller had multiple offers to choose from. Their offer was selected. The buyers’ encounter with the seller, and openness about how they felt, gave them an edge. Also, they were real people to the seller, while the other offers were just paper. The seller trusted them to close the deal.

2. Don’t get negative feelings involved.

While trust is the single most important factor in a negotiation, ego is the most destructive. Many times I have seen buyers include notes with their offers. They point out faults and deficiencies, and explain why the home is not worth the price. I guarantee that these buyers paid a premium. The point is, never run down the sellers’ home. This will bring their feelings to the table. And negative feelings are an unnecessary hurdle to have to overcome. If you have the opportunity, compliment the sellers’ house, decorating and gardens. Don’t forget that their children are always above average, and their pets are practically human. During the negotiation, anchor your offer price to market data.

3. Play on the Same Team.

It is important that you stay on the same team as your clients. A united front is a strong negotiating position. This may not be the way things really are. The wife may love the house, but the husband wants to negotiate the price. You may not approve of some of the terms of the offer. If you reveal a break in your ranks, the sellers will consider your position weaker.

4. Keep a Grain of Salt.

A healthy skepticism is a good thing in negotiation. Not everything you are told is true. How many times have you heard that the contract has to be in this quarter, or the price is going up? Does the 1% bonus for contract this week mean that you have to rush your offer in? Is the price really firm? Proposals such as these show you what is important to the seller. The seller may want close quickly and for full price, but, on the other hand, the seller may want to close, period. I can think of many times when I thought the buyer’s offer would never work, and yet, they got their terms.

5. Understand Special Needs.

A big part of negotiation is subtle. Little things make a big difference. Sometimes good deals go off track because of a difference in the style or personality of the parties. A misperception of the required tone can lead to a decline in trust. Some examples:

Slower Pace – The sellers were a couple in their 90′s. Since they did not leave the house, the buyers met them several times. The buyers took extra time to sit down and talk, and formed a strong bond.

Holy Ground – The sellers had a small grave for their dog on the property, which they were very sensitive about. The buyers realized this, and sent word that they would leave it in place.

For the Birds – The sellers had numerous bird feeders on the property. The buyers keyed in on this, and offered to continue feeding the birds.

Get a Grip – The sellers’ agent tended to give wrong information, did not handle details well, and was untrustworthy. In order to preserve the buyer’s trust, it was necessary to double check everything, handle paperwork, and watch deadlines.

6. Keep private things private.

Buyers may have some issues that should be kept private. They may have just sold their house, and need to act fast. They may need to start kids in school. They may be in the middle of a divorce. They may have an interest rate that is about to expire. Not one of these pieces of information will get them a better deal on a house. In fact, they all indicate that they are under pressure. Your buyers should be perceived as folks who are well qualified, who truly appreciate this home, and who can be trusted to close.

7. Get good information.

Here are some questions to ask before you and your clients compose an offer:

How is the market in general? How are other actives and recent sales priced?

How long has the home been on the market? Have there been price changes?

Did the house sell recently? What was the price?

Is there a time deadline that must be met? Would a pre or post lease be desirable?

What is the appraisal district value? The taxes? The HOA dues?

Is a disclosure available? A property inspection? A survey?

Are there any offers expected, or on the table now?

Price is just one consideration in the negotiation for a home. Other terms, such as financing, close date, repairs, or possession date may be just as important. Negotiating for a house requires skill in giving and taking information, and in communicating to the seller that your clients are the best buyers for their property.

Effective Teaching & Lecturing Presentation

No matter how often you carried the position as a presenter, teacher or lecturer; being new doesn’t mean to be less capable. You’ll be able to perform an effective presentation as long as you know the basic ingredients in making your presentation, teaching or lecturing works well for you and your audience.

Master your subject or topic
The most important key is that you must master the knowledge that you are about to transfer, whatever the subject might be. The more prepared you are in understanding all the necessary aspect to support your subject, the more effective the knowledge would be transferred to your audience. The more you knew, the more they will learn (from you).

Know your personal style
Everyone have their own style based on their personal power and limitation. You should have a unique presentation style. But if you decide to expand your skills, you must prepare yourself with a powerful presentation tool. Remember that you should be careful when it comes to include a joke, because in the certain audience’s mood or perception — sometime it could become a boomerang for you.

Know your audience.
To make an effective presentation you must know your audience before you start your presentation. Relevant topics would make a better perception for your audience. If you haven’t got the chance to do it before the presentation occurred, you must get to know them by asking them what you want to know in the beginning of your presentation. This way you are set for a collaborative, two-way interactive meeting.

First impression does matter.
You always start with an impressive intro to catch their attention. Take half a minute to introduce yourself to all your audiences; you can also use it as an opportunity getting use to the new stage environment. You should also pay a serious attention to what you are wearing and how you are carrying yourself in front of audiences.

Make a catchy intro.
Make a brief & interesting intro on the subject of the presentation. Take a few minutes to talk about the background, history, related supporting topics, etc. It also a good thing if you spare the time to explain the bigger picture of your presentation. So it would be guidance through the topics you will cover — both for you and your audience to stay focus on the given roadmap.

Don’t under estimate an ice breaker.
With an icebreaker, you can bring more enjoyable & informative experience for your audience. As a presenter you can sneak in some witty words or inspirational motivation to your audience to keep their spirit high tuning into your word — until the last session of your presentation. An ice breaker would be more effective if you know your timing.

Make a necessary pause & punctuation.
When delivering your presentation, make sure to take necessary pauses & punctuations, so it won’t sound like you are rambling. It is essentially important if you are a fast talker by nature, or when you are easily carried away in enthusiasm explaining about other supporting topic. Even if you do this to cover up your nervousness, you should give your audience an opportunity to digest all the information while digesting it through for a minute or two.

You’re not suppose to do all the talking!
Just because you are the presenter, teacher or lecturer — it doesn’t mean that you are the only one to do all the talking. By making a two-way interactive conversation you could prevent your audience getting bored by your speech. It is a good way to make an organic interactive presentation, because it means your audience is getting little closer in understanding what you explained earlier to them. You can use it as a brief moment to help you relax and refocus to the next topic in your roadmap.

Invite questions from your audience.
A good presenter would always find a way to invite audience to ask some questions & let everyone participate. You can also pass the wild ball around the audience to measure how much they keep up with what you were saying. It also makes them to pay a better attention & keep them away from sleepiness.

There is a never ending process to be a great presenter, teacher or lecturer — because all great one is come from ongoing practices to shape their perfection.