PowerPoint Tip – Turn Off Pop-Ups When Presenting

In a given day, or week, or month, how many messages pop up on your computer to:

* Update Java, RealPlayer, or Windows?

* Connect to a wireless network?

* Remind you of an upcoming meeting or birthday?

* Keep you up to date on your subscribed RSS feeds?

Warning: Some of these pop-ups may appear while you’re presenting in slide show view! Not a pretty picture!

After a few minutes of inactivity (let’s say you’re answering questions), does your screen saver kick in, or does your computer go into hibernation mode?

Before you get into such a situation, right now, start making a list of the pop-ups that you see, and research how to turn them off. It’s not always easy to find the answer, because the software companies want you to see those pop-ups!

One possible solution may be to disconnect from the Internet, or disable your wireless connection, if you don’t need it during the presentation. Remember that many meeting venues have wireless networks, so your computer may try to connect during your presentation. And disconnecting may disable many other pop-ups. The method depends on your operating system.

In Windows XP, you would probably choose Start> Control Panel> Network Connections. In Windows Vista, try Start> Control Panel> Network and Sharing Center.

You can configure Windows updates by choosing Start> Control Panel> System and clicking the Automatic Updates tab. In Windows Vista, choose Start> Control Panel> Security or Security Center> Windows Update. If you turn them off during your presentation, remember to turn them back on afterwards!

However, some pop-ups don’t depend on an Internet connection or may still pop up a message asking you to connect! For example, Outlook reminders may use your computer’s internal clock. Therefore, you should try disconnecting from the Internet and see whether or not you still get some pop-ups. Of course, you can’t do that for several times just to make sure – that would probably be going too far! But the more planning and testing you do, the less likely that embarrassing pop-up will show its ugly face during your presentation!

Presentation Skills – Connect With Others and Improve Your Public Speaking By Making Presentations

If you have the opportunity to make presentations to groups of people who may be interested in your topic, always go for it. It is good practice to speak to these groups and after a short time you will be able to tell which ones are the best ones for the information you are presenting.

Make sure that you have a handout to give everyone in the audience. Use brightly colored paper and make sure it is at least 24 pound paper so that it is not too flimsy. One page is enough for the handout. It should include some relevant information that they will want to keep, along with your name and contact information. If you have a special class or program coming up, be sure to talk about it and direct them to it on your handout. The idea is that you want the people you speak to to make a connection with you during the time you are there. That way they are far more likely to call you, visit your website, or tell someone else about you.

You may want to begin with smaller groups so that you can practice what you will say and how you will say it. Allow time for questions and spend enough time to give a complete answer. This will be an opportunity for you show that you know more about your topic.

There are always groups looking for speakers. The local Rotary Club, professional organizations and other groups usually need speakers and will give you a chance to talk. Ask them how long you will have and try to visit the location where you will be speaking before the day of the event. This will give you a feel for the room and the surroundings. Arrive a little early so that you can get a good parking spot.

Get a business card from each of the people you are speaking to and promise to give them more information. Ask for their permission to do this so that they do not get upset and feel you are spamming them.

By taking the time to give presentations you can reach more people and perfect your speaking and presentation skills.

How To Combat The Negative Effect Association Has On Negotiations

Have you ever considered how the associations you make about the other negotiator affects your mental state of mind during a negotiation? You more than likely realize that your brain is influenced by subliminal stimuli, based on the associations you make. The associations can be in the form of how you feel about the other negotiator, and/or the surroundings in which the negotiation occurs. Have you considered how to combat such associations when they don’t serve you?

This article delves into perception and security, as two aspects of how you can raise your awareness, per the associations you make during your negotiations.

Perception:

We give our power to those to whom we wish to ingratiate ourselves. We also do so to those that we perceive as having the ability to deliver us from one position to another. Thus, we view such deliverance as beneficial to our well-being.

Negotiation Tip: During your negotiation, you should question the amount of credibility and credence you give the other negotiator, based on how well your joint negotiation outcomes are aligned. Stated differently, to the degree that both of you are pursuing outcomes that are accepted as being mutually beneficial, you can lend more credence to actions that display that demeanor. To the degree your outcomes are adverse to one another, be cautious per the amount of power and control you give away.

When it comes to perception, you must understand preferably at a logical and emotional level, why you wish to subjugate your power to any individual, even more so during a negotiation. In giving your power, you reduce the focus that you might otherwise apply to offers and counter-offers. Suffice it to say, if you wish to relinquish your power do so as part of your negotiation plan. Then, make sure by doing so, you gain an improved position in the negotiation.

False Sense of Security:

There will be times when you’re in environments that will cause you to drop your guard. You may do so because the situation ‘feels right’ based on the accoutrements and trappings in the environment. Be aware when you experience such emotions and don’t fall prey to such surroundings. By maintaining your mental equilibrium, you’ll be more watchful for circumstances that are not beneficial to your negotiation position and expected outcome.

During your negotiations, you’ll be bombarded by ideas, offers, and counter-offers. Be sure to address each in a mindset that’s not clouded by undeserved attributes that don’t serve you. In essence, keep your wits about you and don’t be lulled into a false sense of security, due to the surroundings and goodwill that’s displayed. Be judicious, forthright, and very aware about your needs and why you’re negotiation. I’m not suggesting you be selfish, I’m suggesting you look out for yourself and don’t be overwhelmed by undeserving accoutrements to which you lend undue credibility. If you keep in mind the suggestions above, you’ll enhance your negotiation process. You’ll come out further ahead in your negotiations… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!